Team:UCL/Modeling

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Latest revision as of 03:56, 5 October 2013

DRY LAB

Modelling The Treatment And Finding New Parts

Mathematical modelling provides a powerful tool for scientists of all disciplines, allowing inspection and manipulation of a system in ways which are unachievable in the lab. In the context of biology, we can use mathematical models to study the behaviour of a single cell or an entire ecosystem. In fact, inspecting a mathematical model is very much like a laboratory experiment – the main difference being that in modelling, the environment is artificial.

Click the abstracts below to read more.